Senter Falls

Waterfalls, I just cannot say how much I love them. I usually love them just in the summer, but the last couple winters I have really found a new love for frozen waterfalls. The different formations they take with the change in weather and the beauty of the water rushing below the ice. I recently watch a video on Facebook with Live Free with Kris where she visited four waterfalls in the Wilton/Lynborough Area. i had visited three of them, Purgatory Falls, Tucker Brooks Falls and Garwin Falls. I had not been to or heard of Senter Falls. After a week of being held up inside due to illness I was itching to get out.

Located on Lyndeborough Road in Lyndeborough NH is the trailhead. The best way to get to the trail head is from Second NH Turnpike near the Francestown town line. From there you turn onto Lyndeborough Road, which is a dirt road. When we visited the road had a lot of ruts in it. I’m not sure how well it is maintained when we have snow or what it is like in mud season. Please plan accordingly. The trailhead is about a half mile in on the right hand side. There is a trailhead sign that says Alan and Edgar Rice Nature Area. There was not much of a parking area. There was only enough room across from the trailhead for one car.

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With all the melting and rain we have had the trail was covered in ice requiring microspikes for the hike. You start out by going down a small incline and over a nice wooden bridge.

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After you cross the bridge and bare to the left you will see that you have the option to go right and follow the blue trail markers or go left up a hill following the yellow trail markers. I recommend going right for the best views of the falls. Within just a couple minutes you come to the first set of falls.

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Then you climb up along the waterfall for about a quarter of a mile for some great views.

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With the final cascade being the best off all.

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When you get to the top of the waterfall the trail goes left up a incline, then you follow a ridge and then have a steep downward incline connecting you back to where you started.

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Of course there was a little time to play on the ice on the side of the trail. 

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The trail is a little less than three quarters of a mile. I would only recommend it in the winter if you have some form of microspikes. My daughter did the hike with us, but she also had a form of grips on the bottom of her boots. At times my husband and I still had to help her.

I cannot wait to go back in the spring time to see what it looks like then.

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